Essay on religious beliefs

Locke attacks both the view that we have any innate principles (for example, the whole is greater than the part, do unto others as you would have done unto you, etc.) as well as the view that there are any innate singular ideas (for example, God, identity, substance,  and so forth). The main thrust of Locke’s argument lies in pointing out that none of the mental content alleged to be innate is universally shared by all humans. He notes that children and the mentally disabled, for example, do not have in their minds an allegedly innate complex thought like “equals taken from equals leave equals”. He also uses evidence from travel literature to point out that many non-Europeans deny what were taken to be innate moral maxims and that some groups even lack the idea of a God. Locke takes the fact that not all humans have these ideas as evidence that they were not implanted by God in humans minds, and that they are therefore acquired rather than innate.

There are many acts in the Bible which most people would considered immoral by contemporary standards if they were repeated today. These include religiously-motivated genocide, stoning non-virgin brides to death, burning some hookers alive, treating women as property, etc. If a person simply regards the Bible as a group of books written thousands of years ago and recording Jewish and Christian history, there is little likelihood that it will be declared hate literature. However, many Jews and Christians regard the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament) to be the inerrant Word of God, written by authors that God has directly inspired , and containing injunctions which people should use to govern their behavior today. If people cite or quote passages from the Bible that promote discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sexual orientation, or nationality, etc., and if they advocate that this oppression should continue today, then some courts may define their effort as hate literature. If they do this in the workplace their actions may justify termination.

Omaima Abou-Bakr, "Islamic Feminism: What's in a Name?," Middle East Women's Studies Review, Winter/Spring, 2001.

Leila Ahmed, Women and Gender in Islam: Roots of a Modern Debate, Yale University press, 1992.

Margot Badran, Feminism, Islam, and Nation: Gender and the Making of Modern Egypt, Princeton University Press.

Herbert Bodman and Nayereh Tohidi, editors, Women in Muslim Societies: Diversity Within Unity, 1998.

Fatma Gocek & Shiva Balaghi, editors, Reconstructing Gender in the Middle East: Tradition, Identity and Power, Columbia University Press, 1995.

Ramsya Harike & Elsa Marston, Women in the Middle East: Tradition and Change, Franklin Watts, 1996. Young Adult.

Institute of Islamic Information and Education Brochure, The Question of Hijab: Suppression or Liberation?

Nikki Keddie, "The Past and Present of Women in the Muslim World," Journal of World History, Spring, 1990.

Nikki Keddie & Jasmine Rostam-Kolayi, editors, "Women and Twentieth-Century Religious Politics," Journal of Women's History, Winter, 1999.
Wadud-Muhsin, Qur'an and Woman, Malaysia, 1992. (Available from Arab World Resources).

Essay on religious beliefs

essay on religious beliefs

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