Essay on romeo and juliet conflict act 3 scene 1

As Mercutio tells Benvolio, he hates Tybalt for being a slave to fashion and vanity, one of “such antic, lisping, affecting phantas- / ims, these new tuners of accent! . . these fashionmongers, these ‘pardon-me’s’ ” (–29). Mercutio is so insistent that the reader feels compelled to accept this description of Tybalt’s character as definitive. Tybalt does prove Mercutio’s words true: he demonstrates himself to be as witty, vain, and prone to violence as he is fashionable, easily insulted, and defensive. To the self-possessed Mercutio, Tybalt seems a caricature; to Tybalt, the brilliant, earthy, and unconventional Mercutio is probably incomprehensible. (It might be interesting to compare Mercutio’s comments about Tybalt to Hamlet’s description of the foppish Osric in Act 5, scene 2 of Hamlet, lines 140–146.)

Essay on romeo and juliet conflict act 3 scene 1

essay on romeo and juliet conflict act 3 scene 1

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essay on romeo and juliet conflict act 3 scene 1essay on romeo and juliet conflict act 3 scene 1essay on romeo and juliet conflict act 3 scene 1essay on romeo and juliet conflict act 3 scene 1