Essays on dr seuss

In May 1954, Life magazine published a report on illiteracy among school children which concluded that children were not learning to read because their books were boring. William Ellsworth Spaulding was the director of the education division at Houghton Mifflin (he later became its chairman), and he compiled a list of 348 words that he felt were important for first-graders to recognize. He asked Geisel to cut the list to 250 words and to write a book using only those words. [47] Spaulding challenged Geisel to "bring back a book children can't put down". [48] Nine months later, Geisel completed The Cat in the Hat , using 236 of the words given to him. It retained the drawing style, verse rhythms, and all the imaginative power of Geisel's earlier works but, because of its simplified vocabulary, it could be read by beginning readers. The Cat in the Hat and subsequent books written for young children achieved significant international success and they remain very popular today. In 2009, Green Eggs and Ham sold 540,366 copies, The Cat in the Hat sold 452,258 copies, and One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish (1960) sold 409,068 copies—outselling the majority of newly published children's books. [49]

Whiskey. Yes, alcohol is writing’s seductive little mistress. A well timed shot of whiskey can work wonders for the jittery, neurotic mind. It’s the shock to the system that works for me, so when I can’t start, there are alcohol free alternatives to get things flowing: a cold shower, an underwear clad run up the driveway, a shot of espresso, a peek at my naked wife, the list goes on. Don’t depend on these (as the more you use, the less they work, except for the last one), but occasionally they’re the only way.

If you read Quote Investigator, it explains that the earliest attributions found (of the second part of the quote) were credited to Sir Mark Young, Governor of Hong Kong, in February 1946 in a Canadian Publication “Empire Digest” and again in March 1946 in another Canadian Publication “Lethbridge Herald.” In May 1946 another story appeared in the . in the “Omaha World Herald” also attributed to Sir Mark Young, but the dialog had been changed. Then in August 1946 the quote was found, attributed to Bernard Baruch.
Theodor Seuss Geisel died in 1991, and within 10 years of his death, in the early 2000’s the quote started appearing as coming from him, but there is nothing found in his collective works showing that he ever said it.
Quote Investigator states that it was probably an anonymous piece of wisdom as early as 1938.
Also, there are several versions of the quote:
Do what you want to do, say what you want to say, because those who matter don’t mind, and those who do mind don’t matter.
Say what you want and be who you are, because those who matter don’t mind, and those who matter don’t mind.
Always do what you want, and say what you feel, because those who mind don’t matter, and those who matter don’t mind.
Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind.
It has also been found written as “Those that care don’t matter, and those that matter don’t care.”
The simple truth is, this one has been evolving for some time, and the second part of the quote (Those who…) was circulating more than 50 years before the first part (Be who you are…) was added to the quote placed before the older second part.

THREE WORDS, The Niihau Incident.
I just explained the whole incident, but the page didn’t save it, I don’t think, so type “Niihau Incident” in your search engine. You’ll only have to read a small amount of it to understand why there was fear for a “Fifth Column.”
This event, in my opinion, not only makes the drawing of the “Honorable Fifth Column” painting very appropriate, but accurate as well.
War had not even been declared yet, it was the attack on Pearl Harbor when an Imperial Japanese Pilot crashed on Niihau Island in Hawaii, where is was held by Native Hawaiians. Only 3 Japanese-American people lived on the island. One born in Japan, Ishimatsu Shintani, and two who were Hawaiian born Japanese Americans, Yoshio and Irene Harada. All 3 immediately started to help him escape. Shintani tried via bribery, when that failed Yoshio resorted to violence, even shooting his neighbor of years, 3 times then killing himself when the pilot was killed attempting to shoot his way out.

Essays on dr seuss

essays on dr seuss

THREE WORDS, The Niihau Incident.
I just explained the whole incident, but the page didn’t save it, I don’t think, so type “Niihau Incident” in your search engine. You’ll only have to read a small amount of it to understand why there was fear for a “Fifth Column.”
This event, in my opinion, not only makes the drawing of the “Honorable Fifth Column” painting very appropriate, but accurate as well.
War had not even been declared yet, it was the attack on Pearl Harbor when an Imperial Japanese Pilot crashed on Niihau Island in Hawaii, where is was held by Native Hawaiians. Only 3 Japanese-American people lived on the island. One born in Japan, Ishimatsu Shintani, and two who were Hawaiian born Japanese Americans, Yoshio and Irene Harada. All 3 immediately started to help him escape. Shintani tried via bribery, when that failed Yoshio resorted to violence, even shooting his neighbor of years, 3 times then killing himself when the pilot was killed attempting to shoot his way out.

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