Newspaper articles for stem cell research

Sort and classify. Label each of seven shoe boxes with one of the following newspaper categories: News, Editorials, Features, Humor, Advertising, Sports, and Entertainment. Ask students to cut out the newspaper stories they read each day and put each one in the appropriately labeled shoe box. At the end of the week, have students skim as many of the stories as possible and write an adjective describing each on index cards attached to each box. You might suggest adjectives such as factual, sad, inspiring, opinionated, misleading, silly, serious, and biased. Discuss and compare the adjectives. What conclusions can students reach about each category based on those words?


1.  Who wrote the article? Is the author connected in some way to the issue being discussed? Is the newspaper or news organization affiliated with people who want to project a particular point of view (like a company or a political party)? Does the author's political affiliations conflict with the integrity of the story (surely it does). The author will take sides and project the values he/she believes in.

2.  Why did the writer write the article? Is the purpose to inform the public? Is the purpose to ridicule someone or something? Maybe the purpose is to create fear? Or maybe the author wants to create controversy and sell more papers?

3.  How might other people view the article? Are there stereotypes in the article about people of a different gender, race, social class, or religion? Would anyone be offended by what the author wrote about?

These are just a few things to think about. There are always more questions to ask about every topic. Below are links to some news organizations that might have current articles worth analyzing.

CNN (the original cable news network)

Fox News (a recognized conservative cable news outlet)

Yahoo! News (collects news from various sources and presents them together)

The Los Angeles Times (a local mass-market newspaper)

George Weigel has a reputation, largely among Catholics who have never read him, as a nuanced thinker on matters Catholic, uniquely in the know not only about current Church affairs but also their significance in the larger context of ecclesiastical history.   But as Weigel’s article in First Things concerning Remnant TV's  "Catholics Rising" video on the upcoming Catholic Identity Conference demonstrates, his writing is too often shallow cant thinly disguised by fancy locutions.

Under the portentous title “ The Transmigration of Theological Nonsense ,” which seems to promise serious thought, we find little more than Weigel’s petty quibbling over a couple of Michael Matt’s remarks in the video to the effect that we ought to “take our Church back” from those who have corrupted her doctrine and praxis since Vatican II, as any Catholic who is not comatose can see. With his usual air of pseudo-professorial condescension toward the traditionalists he considers infra dig , Weigel declares: “ The Church is not ‘ours’; the Church is Christ’s.” Quoting himself, Weigel adds: “the Church ‘was not created by us, or by our Christian ancestors, or by the donors to the diocesan annual fund—a point the Lord made abundantly clear himself in the gospels: ‘You did not choose me, but I chose you’…”

In Boston in 1690, Benjamin Harris published Publick Occurrences Both Forreign and Domestick . This is considered the first newspaper in the American colonies even though only one edition was published before the paper was suppressed by the government. In 1704, the governor allowed The Boston News-Letter to be published and it became the first continuously published newspaper in the colonies. Soon after, weekly papers began publishing in New York and Philadelphia. These early newspapers followed the British format and were usually four pages long. They mostly carried news from Britain and content depended on the editor's interests. In 1783, the Pennsylvania Evening Post became the first American daily. [17]

Newspaper articles for stem cell research

newspaper articles for stem cell research

In Boston in 1690, Benjamin Harris published Publick Occurrences Both Forreign and Domestick . This is considered the first newspaper in the American colonies even though only one edition was published before the paper was suppressed by the government. In 1704, the governor allowed The Boston News-Letter to be published and it became the first continuously published newspaper in the colonies. Soon after, weekly papers began publishing in New York and Philadelphia. These early newspapers followed the British format and were usually four pages long. They mostly carried news from Britain and content depended on the editor's interests. In 1783, the Pennsylvania Evening Post became the first American daily. [17]

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