Samuel johnson essay

In addition to writing his own poems, Johnson was throughout his life generous in helping others with their works. The earliest known substantial revision that he did was for Samuel Madden's Boulter's Monument , which appeared in 1745. As Boswell reports, Johnson said that he "blotted a great many lines" in it, and although Madden did not acknowledge Johnson's assistance within the volume, he more substantively thanked him with ten guineas. Boswell mentions Johnson's revisions for the poet Mary Masters, and Johnson also gave John Hawkesworth a couplet for his tragedy, Edgar and Emmeline (1761). During the process of helping Garrick with an epitaph on William Hogarth that the painter's wife had requested, he produced stanzas of his own superior to Garrick's final version inscribed on the monument. Goldsmith requested Johnson's assistance with the proofs of The Traveller (1764), to which Johnson contributed at least nine lines, including four of the five couplets at the end. He also composed the two final couplets of Goldsmith's Deserted Village (1770). Early in 1776 Johnson came to tea with Hannah More and that evening made some alterations for her in Sir Eldred, her recently published tale, and wrote an additional stanza for it. James Grainger sent him the second canto of The Sugar Cane (1764), and Crabbe got Joshua Reynolds to submit the manuscript of The Village (1783) to Johnson, which he returned with some suggested alterations. He also read and revised the poems of Reynolds's sister Frances, in particular changing some bad rhymes. Given the number of people anxious for Johnson to read their works and his characteristic generosity, he undoubtedly rendered a good deal of poetic assistance for which no records survive.

Samuel johnson essay

samuel johnson essay

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